Test courage quotient-FEAR SCORE
Test courage quotient-FEAR SCORE
Reading Time: 3 minutes

This assessment is not the last word in courage and is not meant to brand you as either a hero or a coward. It is merely intended to get a broad measure of how prone you are to fear (Part 1) and how prone you are to bravery (Part 2). Answer the questions below as honestly as possible. You will need a pen and paper for this quiz. Please respond to each statement by choosing the number from 1 to 7 that indicates how much you agree or disagree. Note down the number for each answer, then calculate your score by following the instructions at the end of each part. The final section suggests how to interpret the scores.

1. I take risks because they usually pay off.

1. (Strongly Disagree) 2. ( Disagree) 3. (Slightly Disagree) 4. (Neutral) 5. (Slightly Agree) 6. (Agree) 7. (Strongly Agree)

2. I know I will be able to handle problems if they arise.

1. (Strongly Disagree) 2. ( Disagree) 3. (Slightly Disagree) 4. (Neutral) 5. (Slightly Agree) 6. (Agree) 7. (Strongly Agree)

3. I don’t mind a little conflict if it means doing something important to me.

1. (Strongly Disagree) 2. ( Disagree) 3. (Slightly Disagree) 4. (Neutral) 5. (Slightly Agree) 6. (Agree) 7. (Strongly Agree)

4. I usually expect the best.

1. (Strongly Disagree) 2. ( Disagree) 3. (Slightly Disagree) 4. (Neutral) 5. (Slightly Agree) 6. (Agree) 7. (Strongly Agree)

5. I would be willing to go skydiving or engage in another challenging behaviour just to prove to myself that I could.

1. (Strongly Disagree) 2. ( Disagree) 3. (Slightly Disagree) 4. (Neutral) 5. (Slightly Agree) 6. (Agree) 7. (Strongly Agree)

6. I have a history of taking on challenging projects.

1. (Strongly Disagree) 2. ( Disagree) 3. (Slightly Disagree) 4. (Neutral) 5. (Slightly Agree) 6. (Agree) 7. (Strongly Agree)

7. Intense social pressure would not make me hesitant to do the right thing.

1. (Strongly Disagree) 2. ( Disagree) 3. (Slightly Disagree) 4. (Neutral) 5. (Slightly Agree) 6. (Agree) 7. (Strongly Agree)

8. I would expresss an opinion if I thought it were correct, even if I knew it would be unpopular.

1. (Strongly Disagree) 2. ( Disagree) 3. (Slightly Disagree) 4. (Neutral) 5. (Slightly Agree) 6. (Agree) 7. (Strongly Agree)

9. I would be likely to confront a parent who was yelling in a mean way at a children’s sporting event.

1. (Strongly Disagree) 2. ( Disagree) 3. (Slightly Disagree) 4. (Neutral) 5. (Slightly Agree) 6. (Agree) 7. (Strongly Agree)

10. If there were a medical emergency, I could be counted on to remain calm and do my part.

1. (Strongly Disagree) 2. ( Disagree) 3. (Slightly Disagree) 4. (Neutral) 5. (Slightly Agree) 6. (Agree) 7. (Strongly Agree)

For Part 2 add up your total score and write it down. Scores of 40 to 50 suggest that you tend to take appropriate risks and face challenging circumstances. Very low scores, such as 20 to 30, suggest that you have room to grow in the courage department. Extraordinarily high scores, such as 60 to 70, should also be examined closely. Such scores might indicate that you are naturally courageous but might also indicate a tendency not to look before you leap. The bravest individuals often have to temper their courage to make sure they are using their talents wisely and not taking risks that could bring avoidable negative consequences or failure.

COMPUTING YOUR COURAGE QUOTIENT

When you look at your fear score and at your propensity toward bravery score, bear in mind that these are not infallible measures. They may miss out on small but important aspects of your personality and behaviour. They are not meant to be read as the final authoritative word on anyone’s level of courage. They are simply a psychological “snapshot” of the relative amount of internal fear you contend with on a day-to-day basis, and how accomplished you currently are at dealing with fear. Regardless of the specifics of your scores, the real magic will be in seeing how your fear score diminishes and your propensity toward bravery score increases as you read this book and apply its various techniques.

This quiz is extracted from the book The Courage Quotient: How Science Can Make You Braver, by Robert Biswas-Diener.

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